Updates

We helped win the biggest step forward for clean water in a decade

Over half of the nation’s streams, which feed drinking water sources for one in three Americans, will regain federal protections under a final rule signed by the Obama administration. The measure restores Clean Water Act safeguards to small streams and headwaters that have been vulnerable to development and pollution for nearly 10 years. Environment America and allies gathered more than 800,000 comments and held more than half a million face-to-face conversations about the need to close the loophole in the Clean Water Act. Learn about our Clean Water for America campaign here. 

Report | Environment America

Deepwater Horizon: An Ongoing Environmental Disaster

The BP Deepwater Horizon blowout took a massive toll on our environment and the region’s wildlife and communities. For three months after the initial explosion, millions of gallons of crude oil and thousands of tons of methane spewed from the sea floor. Eleven people were killed and dozens more injured. Five years later, we are still suffering from the effects.

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Blog Post

Ten Ways Your City Can Go Solar | Hillary Larson

Solar power is on the rise across America – increasing 350 times since 2002.
Major cities are helping to lead this clean energy revolution. Our new report, Shining Cities:
Harnessing the Benefits of Solar Energy in America, shows that cities from every region of the U.S. are
driving solar development with strong public policies – reaping important benefits for the environment,
public health and the economy. Investing in local solar power installations can help cities and their
residents keep more of their energy dollars at home, creating good local jobs.
Here are some tips for how your city can follow suit.

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News Release | Environment America

Nearly 1,000 health professionals call for climate action during National Public Health Week

Washington, DC – More heat waves, worse air pollution, and the spread of diseases to new areas are among the growing health threats from climate change, more than 950 health professionals warned in a letter to President Obama today, delivered as part of National Public Health Week.

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News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Millennials came of age in hotter, more extreme climate than their predecessors

WASHINGTON, DC -- Millennials came of age during the hottest ten-year period in the last 100 years. That’s just one of the stats in a new report by Environment America Research & Policy Center showing how young adults are experiencing hotter temperatures and more intense storms than their predecessors did 40 and 50 years ago.

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Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Dangerous Inheritance

As a result of global warming, young Americans today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. Large wildfires have grown bigger, more frequent and more expensive to control. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.

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