Environment America Blog

 | by
Morgan Folger
Director, Destination: Zero Carbon

The window of opportunity is quickly shrinking to take bold action to slow global warming. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s most recent report, we have 12 years -- at most -- to drastically reduce pollution that is warming our atmosphere, and avoid the worst impacts of climate change. In other words, we have until today’s first graders graduate high school to ensure a livable climate for future generations.

I’ve spent a lot of my life buried in a biology book, all the while developing a persistent itch that science and policy operate too far away from each other. This letter showed me that, in fact, the scientific community can use their voice and expertise to inform policies.

I had the distinct pleasure to attend the Senate Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) Committee hearing when it passed the Senate version of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) reauthorization.  I say “pleasure” because in this hyper-partisan atmosphere, it was refreshing to see strong bipartisanship and genuinely friendly cross-aisle cooperation.

Much like many other Americans, the thought of waste makes me cringe. Wasting money, wasting food, wasting my time -- no thanks! So imagine my shock when I found out that a majority of the energy we produce in America goes to waste. To add insult to injury, our wasteful energy practices make the lasting damage to our planet, climate and health caused by our dirty energy mix.

 | by
John Rumpler
Senior Director, Clean Water for America Campaign and Senior Attorney

The Delaware River watershed is a vital source of clean water for drinking, wildlife, and recreation. Its waterways also face a variety of threats – from day-to-day challenges such as polluted runoff and industrial waste, to rare but catastrophic events such as oil spills.

On Sept. 10, California took a big step toward the bright side of history.

Hundreds of thousands of Americans just sent a resounding message in support of one of our nation's most effective conservation laws.

They're used in products from non-stick pans to water-resistant clothing—and now these toxic chemicals are showing up in our drinking water.

With the country's Clean Cars standards at stake, Americans turned out to stand up for cleaner air and a more stable climate.