Environment America Blog

This summer solstice is almost here! To celebrate the longest day of the year, we wanted to share the reasons we love solar. Be sure take the Twitter solstice challenge and tweet out your favorite! 

Margo Pellegrino, a solo-paddler currently in the midst of an epic journey in her outrigger canoe, is inspiration personified. Pellegrino is a paddler with a purpose. She’s raising awareness of watershed issues that impact our drinking water health, and way of life. Instead of doom and gloom, Margo’s message is one of hope — that the problems our waterways face can be fixed. 

It’s easy to get overwhelmed when you’re considering solar panels. Many folks confess they aren’t sure where to start. The first question to answer is whether you’re a good candidate. So here's a flow chart to help you. Check it out.

New York’s decision to launch energy-efficient solar powered trucks onto the streets will help limit pollution from our well-loved food trucks.

Bipartisan support for solar is on the rise! Maryland, Texas, and Georgia all pass new measures to further the local solar revolution, and enable communities increased access to affordable clean energy. 

Charles and David Koch, along with their dirty energy allies, are doing everything they can to block the sun and stop progress towards a solar energy future. 

Solar has been growing at astonishing pace in the last few years, with hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses now powered by the sun.  Because the sun does not shine 24/7, naysayers argue that we have limited ability to capture its unlimited and pollution-free energy. That’s about to change.

Without wetlands, ducks would be, well, sitting ducks. All of North America’s duck and goose species depend on wetland habitats for breeding, rearing, and/or for resting and foraging along their migratory flyways.  Despite the many important reasons for protecting our remaining wetlands, in the last decade, wetlands have actually lost protection. 

This summer, hundreds of thousands of millennials – and others – will flock to music festivals across the country.

Festival attendees might not usually consider environmental impact when buying tickets, but some of them are making cool changes to go green this summer. We took a look at what these festivals are doing and ranked them by how environmentally-friendly they are. 

Solar power is on the rise across America – increasing 350 times since 2002.
Major cities are helping to lead this clean energy revolution. Our new report, Shining Cities:
Harnessing the Benefits of Solar Energy in America, shows that cities from every region of the U.S. are
driving solar development with strong public policies – reaping important benefits for the environment,
public health and the economy. Investing in local solar power installations can help cities and their
residents keep more of their energy dollars at home, creating good local jobs.
Here are some tips for how your city can follow suit.