Administration urged to declare monarch butterflies to be endangered

Decades ago, millions of western monarch butterflies graced our skies. Today, fewer than 2,000 remain.

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Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

Decades ago, millions of western monarch butterflies graced our skies. Today, fewer than 2,000 remain.

Eastern monarchs are in a tailspin of decline, too. That's why, in September, Environment America called on U.S. Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland to issue an emergency Endangered Species Act listing for the monarchs. More than 15,000 of our supporters signed our petition to Secretary Haaland.

Monarchs have been eligible for endangered species protections since December 2020. Yet even as monarch populations drop to all-time lows, the butterflies are still awaiting official endangered status.

“There’s a lot to be done to improve monarch butterfly conservation and research. The actions we take now can help ensure that this iconic species continues to fly for generations to come,” said Environment America's Malia Libby.

Declaring the monarchs to be endangered would facilitate habitat conservation, pesticide restrictions and other extinction-thwarting steps. Under the Endangered Species Act, such listings have a 99% success rate. 

Read more.

Learn more about our Save America's Wildlife campaign.

HELP SAVE MONARCHS

These butterflies are on the brink of extinction — but it's not too late to pull them back.

Tell U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland to use her emergency powers to give monarchs the endangered species protections they deserve.

Photo: There are fewer than 2,000 western monarch butterflies left in the world, and more than 80% of eastern monarchs have died off.  Credit: Bernard-Spragg via Flickr, CC0

Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.