New bill would keep plastics out of national parks

The Reducing Waste in National Parks Act would keep plastics out of our national parks.

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John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.

Our national parks are the last place you want to see plastic litter.

On Oct. 8, Rep. Mike Quigley introduced a bill to help protect them. The Reducing Waste in National Parks Act would ban the sale and distribution of single-use plastic bottles, utensils, straws and packaging from national parks in the United States. Each year, the National Parks Service (NPS) manages an average of nearly 70 million pounds of waste — the same weight as 155 Statues of Liberty.

“From towering trees at Redwood National Park to the geysers at Yellowstone, our national parks protect incredible natural beauty," said Environment America oceans associate Elizabeth DiSanto. "Plastic simply doesn’t belong in these special places." 

This bill, also introduced in the Senate, now moves to the Energy and Natural Resources Committee where it will be amended before moving to a full vote by the House of Representatives.

 

Read more about this bill.

Lean more about our Wildlife Over Waste campaign.

ACT NOW

Moving beyond plastic foam is something we can do right now, right here. If we win, we’ll see a difference in cleaner beaches and parks, and we’ll know it’s making a difference to the wildlife in our rivers, lakes and oceans.

Let’s choose wildlife over waste. Tell our governor and lawmakers to ban plastic foam take-out cups and containers.

Photo: For wildlife, it’s easy to mistake a small piece of plastic for food—especially when there are millions of pieces of plastic floating in our rivers and littering our forests and grasslands. Credit: f11photo via Shutterstock

John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.