Reconnecting Nature

How wildlife corridors can help save species

Elk crossing road with sign
| Public Domain
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Nature in the U.S. has been fragmented into many pieces by roads, fences and other development that blocks the movement of animals. This can knock whole ecosystems out of balance and leave species more susceptible to other challenges like disease and climate change when they are sectioned off into small mating pools.

Wildlife crossings over and under roads are perhaps the most understood type of corridor, but many varieties and flavors exist. This report features 7 case studies that exemplify different ways we can create and protect linkages between various habitat areas, and explains how this would help local wildlife.

Join us for a tour of seven different types of wildlife corridor projects across the U.S. that are working to connect natural areas. At every stop on our journey, see how each project will exemplify a unique way that we can help animals safely access more habitat.

In May 2022 the Safe Crossings for Colorado Wildlife and Motorists Act (SB151) became law. This  measure will provide $5 million for wildlife crossings across the state.  Colorado already had 64 wildlife crossings across the state: This legislation will provide the resources to add more.

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boreal forest
Tim Rains / NPS | Public Domain

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Our forests are invaluable. They’re chock full of centuries old trees, provide irreplaceable wildlife habitat and act as a natural climate solution. It’s up to us to save our forests from clear-cutting. This week make a Giving Tuesday gift to help protect our forests.

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