Toxic threats

It’s up to us to protect our ecosystems and communities from toxic chemicals.

Most of the 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States have been put into use without testing long-term consequences for the environment, or their impacts on our health. We should make sure that any chemical in use is safe, eliminate those we know are dangerous, and stop using any that are damaging healthy ecosystems. And if an industry makes a toxic mess, we should know right away, and they should be the ones to pay for cleaning it up.

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Statement: EPA advises stronger limits on levels of toxic PFAS chemicals to protect Georgians’ health

Clean water

Statement: EPA advises stronger limits on levels of toxic PFAS chemicals to protect Georgians’ health

Atlanta -- The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled on Wednesday new health advisories for four of the most common toxic PFAS chemicals that pollute drinking water nationwide. These official EPA actions “provide technical information to drinking water system operators, as well as federal, state, Tribal, and local officials, on the health effects, analytical methods, and treatment technologies associated with drinking water contaminants.” In addition, the EPA announced the first round of funding to help clean up these so-called “forever chemicals” in public water systems. However, the EPA does not have the authority to enforce any PFAS standard associated with the health advisory.

Media Statements  

Interactive map shows widespread lead contamination in schools drinking water

Toxic threats

Interactive map shows widespread lead contamination in schools drinking water

BOSTON -- Lead contamination of school drinking water is more pervasive than previously thought, according to testing data from across the nation published on Thursday by Environment America Research & Policy Center and U.S. PIRG Education Fund on a new interactive map. The groups urged public officials to take swift action to “get the lead out” of schools’ drinking water.

Media Releases  

Statement: Macon-Bibb County cuts ties with Brightmark, signaling an end to the world’s largest plastic-to-fuel project

Beyond plastic

Statement: Macon-Bibb County cuts ties with Brightmark, signaling an end to the world’s largest plastic-to-fuel project

MACON – The Macon-Bibb County Industrial Authority (MBCIA) ended its relationship last week with Brightmark, a company that was working to build the world’s largest plastics-to-fuel facility just north of the Middle Georgia Regional Airport. The Macon Newsroomobtained a termination contract via an open records request that showed Brightmark's much smaller Indiana facility  had failed to deliver proof of concept.

Media Statements  

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