Toxic threats

It’s up to us to protect our ecosystems and communities from toxic chemicals.

Most of the 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States have been put into use without testing long-term consequences for the environment, or their impacts on our health. We should make sure that any chemical in use is safe, eliminate those we know are dangerous, and stop using any that are damaging healthy ecosystems. And if an industry makes a toxic mess, we should know right away, and they should be the ones to pay for cleaning it up.

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Environmental, public health groups to Senate: Act on toxic PFAS in drinking water

Clean water

Environmental, public health groups to Senate: Act on toxic PFAS in drinking water

Eighty-two organizations, including Environment America and U.S. PIRG, delivered a letter Wednesday to the U.S. Senate’s Environment and Public Works (EPW) Committee calling for comprehensive federal legislation to protect Americans’ drinking water from contamination by the toxic class of chemicals known as PFAS. The organizations, which hail from 30 states, asked the EPW Committee to designate all PFAS as hazardous substances, prohibit their use in firefighting foam, and direct the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue drinking water standards and stop the dumping of PFAS into our nation’s waterways.

Media Releases  

Statement: PFAS Firefighter Protection Act takes on dangerous ‘forever chemicals’

Toxic threats

Statement: PFAS Firefighter Protection Act takes on dangerous ‘forever chemicals’

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) and Rep. Dan Kildee (MI-5) introduced the PFAS Firefighter Protection Act into the Senate and the House this week. The bill aims to ban firefighting foams made with a class of toxic chemicals commonly referred to as PFAS. Firefighting foams, frequently used at airports and military installations, are one of the major sources of PFAS groundwater contamination in the United States. The bill would ensure that such foams are no longer in use within two years from the date it is passed.

Media Statements  

New Study: Lead contamination exceedingly common in Atlantic County school drinking water

Clean water

New Study: Lead contamination exceedingly common in Atlantic County school drinking water

An overwhelming 92% of Atlantic County schools with available testing data had lead in their water at one or more taps, according to a new report released by Environment New Jersey Research & Policy Center and the Black Church Center for Justice and Equality (BCC) on Wednesday. The report also found that water from 45% of all faucets and fountains tested in Pleasantville and Galloway Township schools were tainted with lead. 

Media Releases  

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