News Release | Environment America

Rio Grande Trail to Benefit New Mexico's Economy, Environment and Health

Although still in the planning stages, the Rio Grande Trail will provide hundreds of miles of new trail to hikers, bikers and joggers. Trail-related recreation is the most popular outdoor activity in the state with 41 percent of New Mexicans participating in some form of trail activity every year. This has translated into significant economic gain for the state—the outdoor recreation retail sales account for 4.6 percent of gross state product according to Blazing a Trail: The Benefits of a Rio Grande Trail in New Mexico, a new report released today by Environment New Mexico. The report highlights the need for trail funding from the New Mexico Legislature which convenes in session next week.

Report | Environment America

Blazing a Trail: The Benefits of the Rio Grande Trail in New Mexico

New Mexico is a land of monumental beauty and contrast. From the majestic peaks in northern New Mexico to the white sand dunes of southern New Mexico, the state is full of natural splendor. These remarkable landscapes have made New Mexico a magnet for lovers of the outdoors who are attracted not only to the scenery but the myriad activities to enjoy--none more popular than trail recreation. It is estimated that over 40 percent of New Mexicans take to New Mexico’s trails every year. The popularity of trails is not surprising; untold miles of trails lead people to all corners of the state on foot, bike, rollerblades or horseback to experience the Land of Enchantment up close.

Report | Environment America

Worth More Wild: The Value Of Arizona's Roadless National Forests

After decades of scientific inquiry, 600 public hearings, and a record 1.6 million comments from the American public, the Clinton administration issued the Roadless Area Conservation Rule in January 2001.  The Roadless Rule, as it is commonly known, originally protected 58.5 million acres of wild national forest land from most commercial logging and road-building, and associated mining and drilling.  Since then, the Bush administration has removed these protections from 9.5 million acres of roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest. 

Report | Environment America

Worth More Wild: The Value Of Florida's Roadless National Forests

After decades of scientific inquiry, 600 public hearings, and a record 1.6 million comments from the American public, the Clinton administration issued the Roadless Area Conservation Rule in January 2001.  The Roadless Rule, as it is commonly known, originally protected 58.5 million acres of wild national forest land from most commercial logging and road-building, and associated mining and drilling.  Since then, the Bush administration has removed these protections from 9.5 million acres of roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest.

Report | Environment America

Worth More Wild: The Value Of Pennsylvania's Roadless National Forest

After decades of scientific inquiry, 600 public hearings, and a record 1.6 million comments from the American public, the Clinton administration issued the Roadless Area Conservation Rule in January 2001. The Roadless Rule, as it is commonly known, originally protected 58.5 million acres of wild national forest land from most commercial logging and road-building, and associated mining and drilling. Since then, the Bush administration has removed these protections from 9.5 million acres of roadless areas in the Tongass National Forest.

Result

We won a temporary ban on mining near the Grand Canyon.

Toxic mining has no place near the Grand Canyon. The Obama administration responded to calls from Environment America and our allies, and issued a temporary ban on new mining on more than 1 million acres surrounding the Grand Canyon. We’re pushing hard to make the ban permanent while working to stop mining outside Minnesota’s Boundary Waters, Yosemite and other special places.

Result

We protected Glacier National Park from drilling.

More than 200,000 acres surrounding Glacier National Park are now protected from drilling, after we mobilized thousands of people in Montana and across the country to urge Montana’s senators and former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to ban nearby drilling. BP, Halliburton and the other companies that had leased sites saw the writing on the wall and voluntarily relinquished more than 80% of their drilling leases.

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