Millions of Americans are worried about toxic PFAS chemicals that have contaminated their drinking water. The federal government is finally responding to their concerns.

News Release | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Environment America Research & Policy Center releases revised report on water pollution at beaches

Following questions raised about data in the original version of our “Safe for Swimming?” report released Tuesday, July 23, Environment America Research & Policy Center is rereleasing its study about fecal bacteria in waters off U.S. beaches. 

Report | Environment America Research and Policy Center

Safe for Swimming?

The Clean Water Act, adopted in 1972 with overwhelming bi-partisan support, had the farsighted and righteous goal of making all our waterways safe for swimming. Yet 46 years later, all too often, Americans visiting their favorite beach are met by an advisory warning that the water is unsafe for swimming. Even worse, in recent years millions of Americans have been sickened by swimming in contaminated water.

Maine and Colorado are setting the pace for climate action in 2019

By | Ross Sherman
Communications Associate

New governors across the country have grabbed the mantle to address the climate crisis

News Release | Environment America

House passes sweeping PFAS protections: 2025 ban on military use, Superfund cleanup and clean water safeguards

The U.S. House approved a host of provisions today to address widespread drinking water contamination from toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The annual defense spending bill would phase out the military’s use of PFAS-containing firefighting foams by 2025 — a major source of drinking water contamination. The bill would also designate all PFAS chemicals as hazardous substances under Superfund and toxic pollutants under the Clean Water Act, spurring cleanup and reducing discharges into waterways, respectively.

Both chambers have now incorporated our request to rapidly phase out the military’s use of PFAS. This is what communities and service members deserve. The House wants this phaseout by 2025, while the Senate says 2023. We are gratified to see this Congressional race to the top.

Toxic foams that threaten the health of armed service members and their neighbors would no longer be used on military bases under Environment America-backed legislation.

News Release | Environment America

Senate approves 2023 ban on military’s toxic PFAS foams

The U.S. Senate passed its annual defense policy bill today with a host of provisions to address widespread drinking water contamination from toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). One key provision would phase out the military’s use of PFAS-containing firefighting foams — a major source of pollution — by 2023. By incorporating our request to adopt a 3-year timeline for phasing out military use of PFAS, the Senate bill prevents further contamination quickly — which is what communities and service members deserve.

News Release | Environment America

Statement: House should adopt three-year phaseout of PFAS in military

The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services approved provisions in the annual defense policy bill early this morning that would phase out the military’s use of toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in firefighting foams. Right now, Congress has a critical opportunity to stamp out a major threat to our public health. Millions of people across the country are currently drinking water contaminated with toxic PFAS chemicals. Eliminating the use of these chemicals is the best way to protect our drinking water from these dangerous substances.

News Release | Environment America

Statement: Senate hearing highlights need for clean water protections

The U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works held a hearing this morning on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposal to replace the Clean Water Rule. The proposed rule would roll back protections for much of America’s network of waterways. The administration’s ‘Dirty Water Rule’ would leave vast networks of America’s rivers, lakes and streams vulnerable to pollution, endangering wildlife and public health. It flies in the face of common sense, sound science and public opinion.

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