Solar power is a growing American success story

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have gone solar and millions more are ready to join their ranks so all of us can power our lives and our communities with clean, renewable, local energy. The barriers to solar are falling faster than ever, too, with more and more cities, states and companies adopting innovative pro-solar policies that have made solar cheaper and easier to install.

That’s why we have 10 times more solar power in the U.S. today than we did in 2010, enough to power more than 5 million homes, with another home going solar every two minutes, as of the end of 2015.

What are we up against? 

Yet just as solar is about to reach a tipping point, some utilities and other special interests want to throw new obstacles in the way. Our Solar for All campaign is working to knock those barriers out of the way so more Americans can go solar.

We’re working to urge mayors, governors and others to set ambitious solar goals and commitments, offer new solar incentives, and promote new community solar programs. And we’re mobilizing people to counter the utilities and other special interests who want to make solar more expensive and harder to install.

We’re fighting attacks

And we’re winning. In just the past year, we’ve turned back attacks on solar in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico and won new commitments to solar in Austin and Houston, Athens and Atlanta, and New York State and California, among other places. Over the last 10 years, we’ve helped establish dozens of pro-solar programs, including the biggest: California’s Million Solar Roofs Initiative.

What can you do? 

We want you to join us by showing your support for solar. You can send an email to your local officials, write a letter to your local newspaper, attend one of our solar forums, or join us at a news conference or other special event.

Whatever you can do, the time for action is now. Solar is at a tipping point. If we keep winning more pro-solar policies, we’ll see millions more Americans go solar in the next decade, putting us on a path to a 100% renewable future. If we let utilities and other special interests get in the way, that future will remain out of reach as solar sputters and stalls.

Together, we can achieve Solar for All

We can do this. Together, we can bring more solar power to our homes, our communities, our churches and schools, our workplaces and our lives—and leave a cleaner, healthier world for kids growing up today and future generations.

Solar For All Updates

News Release | Environment America

Finalized Building Energy Codes Would Reduce Carbon Pollution by 200 Million Tons and Save U.S. Consumers and Businesses $40 Billion Annually by 2030

Today, the International Codes Council released the final version of updated energy codes for homes and businesses. The widespread adoption of this updated code by local and state governments, which are 30 percent more effective than the 2006 code, would save American homes and businesses $40 billion annually in energy costs by 2030, according to the Alliance to Save Energy.

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News Release | Environment America

Senate Committee to Vote on Dangerous Energy Bill

Today, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will consider the Clean Energy Finance Act of 2011. The bill would create an energy deployment administration with broad authority to provide financial support for a wide array of energy technologies. While energy use and production remains the largest source of pollution in the U.S., the deployment administration could support energy technologies that are as dirty as our current energy sources. For electricity, the bill could subsidize nuclear power, advanced coal, natural gas and municipal solid waste along with truly clean technologies such as wind, solar power and energy efficiency. In the transportation sector, the bill could subsidize fuels that are as dirty as gasoline, which is responsible for more global warming pollution than any other fuel source in the United States. Finally, the bill could also support technologies like coal-to-liquids or tar sands oil as long as their emissions were comparable to those of gasoline.

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News Release | Environment America

Visionary Solar Power Legislation Considered in Senate Committee

The Ten Million Solar Roofs Act of 2011 will be considered in the Energy and Natural Resources committee today. Senators Bernie Sanders (I - VT), John Boozman (R – AR) and Energy and Natural Resources Chairman Jeff Bingaman (D – NM) introduced the Act, which would establish a goal of powering 10 million homes and businesses with solar energy by 2020. The measure also would incorporate a Department of Energy initiative called SunShot to make solar power more competitive with conventional energy technologies. The bill would provide grants to communities to help them make their solar energy permitting process less costly and more efficient, and would recognize and reward communities that have adopted common policies on solar permits.

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News Release | Environment America

House Considers Step Backwards on Energy Efficient Light Bulbs

The House of Representatives will soon vote on Rep. Barton’s Better Use of Light Bulbs (BULB) Act. The bill would repeal energy efficiency standards for light bulbs that were originally passed with industry support and a large bipartisan majority in 2007. According to a study by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy the standards could lead to $11.9 billion per year in energy savings when fully instituted

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News Release | Environment America

San Antonio Power Plant Expected to Be Retired

Environment Texas hailed the expected announcement today by San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro that the city-owned CPS Energy will retire the polluting Deely power plant by the year 2018 and replace its power with additional investments in solar energy. According to research by Environment Texas, in 2009, the Deely plant emitted 3657 tons of nitrogen oxide, a key precursor to smog pollution. The two Deely smokestacks join with the two “Spruce” units to make up the Calaveras Power Station, which an April Environment Texas report found ranked 11th out of the state’s 20 power plants for mercury pollution. And according to a study by the Clean Air Task Force, power plant pollution in Bexar County is linked to 282 asthma attacks and 11 deaths every year.

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