One step closer to permanent protections for Bristol Bay

Good news: a reckless plan to site a toxic open-pit mine the size of Manhattan next to Alaska’s Bristol Bay has run into another roadblock. 

 | 
John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.

A reckless plan to site a toxic open-pit mine the size of Manhattan next to Alaska’s Bristol Bay has run into another roadblock.

On Oct. 29, U.S District Court Judge Sharon Gleason affirmed that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the legal authority to permanently protect Bristol Bay. Under the Clean Water Act, the EPA can now prevent mining in the "Pebble deposit," an area located in the watershed between two of the rivers that feed the bay.

"Bristol Bay is a vast, beautiful and ecologically important area" said Dyani Chapman, Environment America’s Alaska organizer. "If it was allowed to move forward, the Pebble Mine would destroy thousands of acres of wetlands, fragment a contiguous healthy ecosystem, and pollute Bristol Bay with mining refuse and chemicals."  

Along with Environment America, the Pebble Mine project is opposed by other environmental groups, local business owners, fishermen and elected officials in Alaska.

Read more about this story.

Lean more about our More Nature campaign.

MORE NATURE: 30 PERCENT BY 2030 RESOLUTION

The wild places we love and need are under siege from oil drilling, overfishing and other threats. That's why we want to set a national target of protecting 30 percent of our land and 30 percent of our ocean by 2030.



Photo: At nearly 27.5 million acres, Bristol Bay is an incredibly special place -- serving as a home to over 200 species, including brown bears, Right whales and the emblematic bald eagle. Credit: liveyourlife via Shutterstock

John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.