Update: Actions Congress can take today on climate

The Supreme Court yesterday limited the EPA’s ability to limit power plant pollution. There’s still a lot the EPA can and must do, as well as states, cities and companies, but in the meantime, here are three actions Congress should take to act on climate.

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Lisa Frank
Executive Director, Washington Legislative Office, Environment America

Author: Lisa Frank

Executive Director, Washington Legislative Office, Environment America

Started on staff: 2016
B.A., magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa and recipient of the Government Department Award and American Government Award, Georgetown University

Lisa directs strategy and staff for Environment America's federal campaigns. She also oversees The Public Interest Network's Washington, D.C., office and operations. She has won millions of dollars in investments in walking, biking and transit, and has helped develop strategic campaigns to protect America's oceans, forests and public lands from drilling, logging and road-building. Lisa is an Oregonian transplant in Washington, D.C., where she loves hiking, running, biking, and cooking for friends and family.

The Supreme Court yesterday limited the EPA’s ability to limit power plant pollution. There’s still a lot the EPA can and must do, as well as states, cities and companies, but in the meantime, here are three actions Congress should take to act on climate -- and how you can help.

1. Pass tax credits for clean, renewable energy and electric vehicles: A package of tax credits to bring down the price of solar, wind power, energy storage, electric vehicles and more already passed the U.S. House of Representatives and could bring down power sector emissions 64-73% below 2005 levels. Tell the Senate to act.

2. End fossil fuel subsidies: Every year, the United States government gives away $20 billion to the fossil fuel industry in the form of tax breaks, incentives and other subsidies. Tell Congress to stop propping up polluters.

3. Strengthen the Clean Air Act: Congress can grant EPA express powers to reduce global warming pollution in the most effective way possible.

Lisa Frank
Executive Director, Washington Legislative Office, Environment America

Author: Lisa Frank

Executive Director, Washington Legislative Office, Environment America

Started on staff: 2016
B.A., magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa and recipient of the Government Department Award and American Government Award, Georgetown University

Lisa directs strategy and staff for Environment America's federal campaigns. She also oversees The Public Interest Network's Washington, D.C., office and operations. She has won millions of dollars in investments in walking, biking and transit, and has helped develop strategic campaigns to protect America's oceans, forests and public lands from drilling, logging and road-building. Lisa is an Oregonian transplant in Washington, D.C., where she loves hiking, running, biking, and cooking for friends and family.