Pesticides

The unnecessary use of pesticides is harming ecosystems and threatening our health.

If you’re lucky, you might see a summer’s field buzzing with bees or a flock of monarch butterflies undertaking their annual migration. But our country’s overuse of toxic pesticides is making such sights less common as it makes much of our country’s environment toxic. Seeping far beyond the initially treated zones, these pesticides are infiltrating our soil, water systems and food chains. Together, we can put our country on a safer path free of pesticides.

The Latest on Pesticides
The American bumblebee is on the decline
An American bumblebee sits on a white flower.

Save the bees

The American bumblebee is on the decline

In the past two decades, American bumblebee populations have dropped by 90%. If the decline of bees like this native pollinator isn't halted, plants and ecosystems across the country will suffer.

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Did You Know?
Monarch populations have dropped by more than 80% in recent decades, due in part to our country’s overuse of pesticides.

Want to learn more about the toxic impacts pesticides are having on our ecosystems and wildlife?

Meet the bees we’re working to save

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Meet the bees we’re working to save
A bee sits on a flower with pollen on its legs

Save the bees

Meet the bees we’re working to save

Bees of all kinds are facing a triple threat of pesticides, habitat loss and climate change. As we work to save them, let’s get to know them a little better.

Bee-Thankful this Thanksgiving

Save the bees

Bee-Thankful this Thanksgiving

We don’t see many bees flying around New York at the end of November, but we do see the fruits of their labor. Pumpkin pie, cranberry sauce, green beans and more of the foods that make Thanksgiving dinner so special are possible through the work of bees. But bees are at risk. So this holiday season, chefs, restaurant owners and environmental advocates are speaking out to protect bees and help stop them from dying off at alarming rates. “We’re thankful for bees this Thanksgiving,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Without bees, Thanksgiving dinners around the country would look and taste different. No bees means having to do without many of our favorite holiday foods.”

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Team
Steve
Blackledge

Steve
Blackledge

Senior Director, Conservation America Campaign, Environment America