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Wildlife & wild places

Tell The Home Depot: Preserve the boreal forest

The Canadian boreal forest is the largest remaining primary forest on the planet. It stores 300 billion tons of carbon, provides habitat for threatened boreal caribou, billions of birds and a multitude of other species.

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Clean water to drink and clean air to breathe; healthy lakes, rivers and forests; sources of energy that don’t pollute and never run out — all this should be the heritage we leave to future generations.

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A wave of youth ocean activism in Boston
Group of students stand in front of whale on UMass Boston's campus holding a

Oceans

A wave of youth ocean activism in Boston

Over 150 students from across the region attended the first-ever New England Youth Ocean Summit about and took action in support of protecting our oceans from rising temperatures, pollution, plastic, deep-sea mining, and more.

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What You Can Do
For millennia, ancient forests have watched over us and sustained us. Can we do the same for them? Will Harlan, Center for Biological Diversity
"So when it comes to clean water, the first line of defense starts with mature and old growth forests. Preserving old growth trees coincides with improving water quality." Victoria Frankeny, Tualatin Riverkeepers
Protecting the intact public forests that remain are the keys to allowing forests to perform their natural role in regulating climate, while protecting communities from wildfires. Ric Bailey, North Cascades Conservation Council
Grassroots climate groups like mine, 350 Eugene, understand that forest defense is climate defense, and we're fierce. Patty Hine, 350 Eugene
We must courageously acknowledge the disappearance of these towering trees, and then turn loss into decision. The old-growth forest is literally just a thought form away. We are the children of the children of the generation who cut the forest down. We can be the generation that chooses to bring it back. Nancy Stranahan, Arc of Appalachia